How and Why to Analogize Socratic Questioning to Zen Buddhist Koan Practice

Main Article Content

Hake Stephanie E http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4956-8572

Abstract

The nature and aim of Socrates’ philosophical method is a contested matter in ancient philosophy scholarship. Among scholars who believe that there is a coherent method in Plato’s dialogues, it is generally agreed that Socrates’ method is a practice that aims to elicit something by way of question and answer. I, among others, believe that something to be a transformation (in the sense of an awakening) on the part of the interlocutor to his own ignorance and conceit of knowledge. Instead of pointing to Plato’s dialogues for evidence in order to argue for this, I analogize the method and aim of Socratic Questioning to Zen Buddhist koan practice.

Article Details

How to Cite
Stephanie E, H. (2014). How and Why to Analogize Socratic Questioning to Zen Buddhist Koan Practice. S O C R A T E S, 2(3), 27-45. Retrieved from https://socratesjournal.com/index.php/SOCRATES/article/view/16
Section
Philosophy

References

Benson, H.H. (2000). Socratic Wisdom: The Model of Knowledge in Plato’s Early Dialogues. New York: Oxford University Press.
Beversluis, J. (2000). Cross-Examining Socrates. New York: Cambridge University Press.
Brickhouse, T.C. and N.D. Smith. (2000). The Philosophy of Socrates. Colorado: Westview Press.
Forster, M. (2006). “Socrates’ Demand For Definitions”. In D. Sedley (Ed.). Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy XXXI, 31,
Foulk, T.G. (2000). “The Form and Function of Koan Literature: A Historical Overview”. The Koan: Texts and Contexts in Zen Buddhism. New York: Oxford University Press.
Frede, M. (1992). “Plato’s Arguments and the Dialogue Form”. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Grube, G.M.A. (1981). Five Dialogues: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Phaedo. Indiana: Hackett Publishing Company.
Heine, S. and D.S. Wright. (2000). “Introduction: Koan Tradition—Self-Narrative and Contemporary Perspectives”. The Koan: Texts and Contexts in Zen Buddhism. New York: Oxford University Press.
Kraut, R. (2013). "Plato". The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. E.N. Zalta (Ed.). Retrieved from http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/fall2013/entries/plato/.
Nails, D. (1999). “Mouthpiece Schmouthpiece”. Who Speaks for Plato? G.A. Press. (Ed.). Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield.
Peterson, S. (2011). Socrates and Philosophy in the Dialogues of Plato. New York: Cambridge University Press.
Plato. (1987). Gorgias. D.J. Zeyl (Trans.). Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Company.
---. Five Dialogues: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Phaedo. G.M.A. Grube (Trans.). Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Company, 2002. pg, 1-20, 21-44, 58-92.
Sick, D. (2007). “When Socrates met the Buddha: Greek and Indian Dialectic in Hellenistic Bactria and India”. Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland 17.3.
SparkNotes Editors. “SparkNote on Meno.” SparkNotes.com. SparkNotes LLC. n.d.. Web. 22 Jun. 2014.
Tarrant, H. (2002). “Elenchos and Exetasis: Capturing the Purpose of the Socratic Interrogation”. Does Socrates Have a Method? Rethinking the Elenchus in Plato’s Dialogues and Beyond. Ed. Scott, G.A. University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania State University Press.
Suzuki, S. (1970). Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind. Ed. Trudy Dixon. New York: John Weatherhill, Inc.
Vlastos, G. (1983). “The Socratic Elenchus”. The Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy.
Wolfsdorf, D. (2013). “Socratic Philosophizing”. The Bloomsbury Companion to Socrates. Bloomsbury Academic.
Zehl, D. (1987). “Introduction”. Gorgias. Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Company.
Zen Buddhism: An Introduction to Zen with Stories; Parables and Koan Riddles Told by the Zen Masters. Mount Vernon, New York: Peter Pauper Press, 1959.